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One more reason to focus on prenatal care – stronger muscles for newborn babies
Articles / nutrition / Prenatal

One more reason to focus on prenatal care – stronger muscles for newborn babies

Born too soon, she weighed just over 1 pound at birth and spent the first three months of her life in the neonatal intensive care unit, fighting to live. This tiny baby survived under the care of skilled medical professionals and was sent home with her teenage mother. Today, she’s a high school student enrolled … Continue reading

Image of the Month: the Human Heart
Articles

Image of the Month: the Human Heart

In the month of February, From the Labs celebrates the human heart. At Baylor College of Medicine, researchers are carrying out pioneering basic cardiovascular research that is interwoven with education and clinical trials through Baylor-affiliated hospitals. For more information visit: Cardiovascular Research Institute Atherosclerosis and Vascular Medicine – Research Laboratory for Cardiac Regeneration  Baylor College of … Continue reading

How do muscles grow up? Check alternative splicing
Articles / Genetics / muscular disorders

How do muscles grow up? Check alternative splicing

Growing up is a complex affair, even for muscles. In the mouse, for instance, newborn muscles grow into adult muscles within the first three weeks after birth. This transition allows a newborn mouse with limited ability to move to become an agile, fast-moving creature. During this transition, some of the newborn muscle proteins are replaced by adult … Continue reading

Making the case for global genomic data sharing
Articles / Global Data Sharing

Making the case for global genomic data sharing

The scientific community may be overlooking a significant barrier to international collaboration reflected in a series of recent surveys: potential public resistance to sharing of genomic and other health data across national borders. In a paper published in PLOS Biology, Dr. Mary Majumder, associate professor in the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College … Continue reading

Surviving bodily defenses: human rotavirus manipulates immune response to maintain infection
Articles / Gastrointestinal diseases / rotavirus

Surviving bodily defenses: human rotavirus manipulates immune response to maintain infection

The gut of a child infected with rotavirus is like a battleground. On one side, the virus invades the epithelial cells that form the lining of the small intestine. The virus replicates driving havoc in the intestinal environment, which causes severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever and abdominal pain. Dehydration usually follows and, unless the child is … Continue reading

A pill to prevent Alzheimer’s disease might someday be a reality
Alzheimer's disease / Articles / Genetics

A pill to prevent Alzheimer’s disease might someday be a reality

Taking a pill that prevents the accumulation of toxic molecules in the brain might someday help prevent or delay Alzheimer’s disease, according to scientists at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s Hospital and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The scientists took a three-pronged approach to help subdue early events that occur in the brain long before … Continue reading

Improving the view on the genetic causes of retinitis pigmentosa
Articles / Genetics / Retinitis pigmentosa

Improving the view on the genetic causes of retinitis pigmentosa

Progressive development of night blindness and tunnel vision, sometimes from the early age of 2, are trademarks of retinitis pigmentosa. Being the most common inherited disorder of the retina, retinitis pigmentosa affects nearly 1 in 4,000 people. More than 1 million are visually impaired around the world due to this untreatable disease. A number of … Continue reading