‘Listening’ to single cells may uncover cancer origins
Articles / Cancer

‘Listening’ to single cells may uncover cancer origins

Listening to a single voice in a crowd can be difficult. In a similar way, determining gene expression in single cells has posed quite a challenge.  A major step toward single-cell analysis can potentially help scientists study how cancerous tumors begin, which could lead to better treatments, diagnosis and prevention in the future. “Cancer begins with … Continue reading

Toys and science connected on new free STEM initiative
Articles / Community Outreach / STEM Education

Toys and science connected on new free STEM initiative

Connecting toys with science is one of the best ways to teach STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) education curriculum. And that is what a collaboration between Baylor College of Medicine and Hess Corp. has achieved and offers to schools nationwide. It all started when Hess Corp. donated about 4,000 of its 2016 Hess Toy Truck and Dragster … Continue reading

Image of the Month: Lighting up blood vessels in a tumor
Articles / Cancer

Image of the Month: Lighting up blood vessels in a tumor

When a mouse breast tumor is exposed to radio frequency (RF) electric fields the interaction between RF electric fields and the cancer tissue causes tumor vessels to dilate and open up. The network of blood vessels in the tumor can be seen with a fluorescence microscope when injecting fluorescent quantum dots (green) that lit up as they flow … Continue reading

Timing exercise with muscle fuel switching could help you lose weight
Articles / circadiam rhythm / Muscle fuel switch

Timing exercise with muscle fuel switching could help you lose weight

Skeletal muscles change their fuel preference according to a circadian rhythm. Mouse muscles, for instance, use glucose as fuel when the animals are awake and active and switch to fat when they are asleep. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that control the switch from glucose to fat can have significant repercussions in how people manage diabetes, … Continue reading

Autism spectrum disorder: if not vaccines, then what?
Articles / Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism spectrum disorder: if not vaccines, then what?

New information gained from major scientific papers over the last two years has shed light on the causes and progression of autism spectrum disorder.  Estimates from the Global Burden of Disease Study indicate that globally 62.2 million people are currently on the autism spectrum and are affected by autism spectrum disorder.  Such numbers have not … Continue reading

Out of sync, out of health: Social jet-lag linked to liver cancer in mice
Articles / circadiam rhythm / Liver cancer

Out of sync, out of health: Social jet-lag linked to liver cancer in mice

Our bodies are in sync with the planet’s day-and-night cycle thanks to an internal timekeeper, the circadian clock that regulates practically all the functions of the body. Recent studies have uncovered that when the internal clock goes out of sync, disease has a better chance to develop. For instance, persistent disruption of circadian rhythm in … Continue reading

Collaboration matters when looking for answers to undiagnosed diseases
Articles / Human genetics / undiagnosed diseases

Collaboration matters when looking for answers to undiagnosed diseases

It used to be that identifying genes involved in a particular disease was like finding a needle in a haystack. Nowadays, scientists still have to search through haystacks of genetic data, but advances in gene sequencing technologies and in computerized strategies to search genomic data sets with vast amounts of information have made the job … Continue reading