The writhing and coiling of DNA drives cell activity
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The writhing and coiling of DNA drives cell activity

By Ruth SoRelle, M.P.H. Using a multidisciplinary approach, researchers, led by those at Baylor College of Medicine, revealed in unprecedented detail the three-dimensional structure of biologically active DNA. A report on their work appears online in the journal Nature Communications. “The beautiful double-helical structure we all know and love is not the actual active form of … Continue reading

Image of the Month: Organizing DNA
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Image of the Month: Organizing DNA

A multi-institutional team spanning Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University, Stanford University, and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has reported the first successful surgery to change how the genome is folded inside the nucleus — an advance that may help scientists better understand genetic disease. Last year, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine’s … Continue reading

CRISPR/Cas9 : Disruptive or Innovative?
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CRISPR/Cas9 : Disruptive or Innovative?

Stirring high-profile debates over the past few months, the controversial genome editing technique, CRISPR/Cas9, continues to make scientific headlines. The June 4, 2015 issue of NATURE spotlights the ethical and safety concerns this technique raises, even referring to it as “CRISPR, the disruptor.” Experts in the Center for Reproductive Medicine (CRM) at Baylor College of … Continue reading

Deep brain stimulation overcomes cognitive deficits in Rett mice
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Deep brain stimulation overcomes cognitive deficits in Rett mice

Deep brain stimulation — usually used to treat movement disorders – overcomes the learning and memory deficits in mice whose symptoms mimic those of Rett syndrome, a neurological disease usually found in young girls, said researchers led by those from Baylor College of Medicine and the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas … Continue reading