Image of the Month – Cell-based trafficking of nanoparticles
Articles / nanoparticles / Surgery

Image of the Month – Cell-based trafficking of nanoparticles

Cell-based trafficking of nanoparticles is achieved through in situ uptake and transport of nanoparticles by myeloid cells.  Shown here is the cell membrane of a macrophage, pseudo-colored in green, in the process of internalizing silica nanoparticles, pseudo-colored in pink. Photo by Dr. Rita Serda in the department of surgery. Continue reading

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Do you want to change how you receive From the Labs?

From the Labs from Baylor College of Medicine for September is now online. In this month’s issue, the power of social media helps solve a genetic mystery. Master regulators get super-stimulated to become cancer fighters. An ethical framework guides explanations of children’s genome results. Disrupting a cellular machine may also disrupt cancer. Scientists make many … Continue reading

Ethical framework sets stage for explaining genome sequencing to parents/children
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Ethical framework sets stage for explaining genome sequencing to parents/children

By Ruth SoRelle, M.P.H. The genomics era presents complicated issues for parents and pediatricians alike as they seek to understand what the results of complete genome sequencing mean to youngsters for whom they are seeking a diagnosis. How does the pediatrician explain the information to the parents and/or children? Which information is relevant to them … Continue reading

Disruption of a crucial cellular machine may kill the engine of deadly cancers
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Disruption of a crucial cellular machine may kill the engine of deadly cancers

By Ruth SoRelle, M.P.H. Cancer resembles a runaway car with a gas pedal stuck to the floor, hurling out of control. Most targeted cancer therapies seek to fix the gas pedal itself, and thus thwart the aggressive behavior of the tumor. In many types of cancers, the “pedal” cannot be repaired, requiring alternatives. A team … Continue reading

Super stimulation makes master regulators into cancer cell killers
Articles / Cancer

Super stimulation makes master regulators into cancer cell killers

By Ruth SoRelle, M.P.H. Dr. Bert O’Malley, chair of molecular and cellular biology at Baylor College of Medicine, found the first steroid receptor coactivator, and as he continued to work with this powerful group of cellular proteins, he realized that they could have a potent effect on cancer. In a recent publication in the journal … Continue reading