Latest Entries
Restoring Glutathione Levels Promotes Metabolic Health in Older HIV-Infected Patients
Articles

Restoring Glutathione Levels Promotes Metabolic Health in Older HIV-Infected Patients

Restoring levels of glutathione, the body’s most abundant antioxidant, in older patients with HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS) improved cellular ability to burn fuel, sensitivity to insulin, body composition and muscle strength, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine in a recent publication in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. “This … Continue reading

Image of the Month: Life as art
Articles / Cancer / exome

Image of the Month: Life as art

Translational medicine might mean one thing to the scientific world, but to an artist, it is something completely different. For example, this cover illustration for the latest edition of Cancer Cell highlights research from an international collaboration lead by Baylor College of Medicine’s Human Genome Sequencing Center. The findings identified whole genome analysis of chromophobe … Continue reading

Articles

Cellular process required for vaccine protection identified

Memories don’t just happen in the brain – our immune system also can maintain long-term memory against viruses. That is why vaccinations have been the most widely used strategy to protect against viral infection for centuries. However, the cellular processes that control our immune system’s “memory” have yet to be fully explained. Researchers at Baylor … Continue reading

Marmoset sequence sheds new light on primate biology and evolution
Articles

Marmoset sequence sheds new light on primate biology and evolution

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset – the first sequence of a New World Monkey – providing new information about the marmoset’s unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light … Continue reading

Houston Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Longitudinal Study Marks 32 years
Articles

Houston Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Longitudinal Study Marks 32 years

By Dr. Gail Demmler Harrison, professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine and attending physician in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Texas Children’s Hospital 2014 marks the 32nd year I have studied congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV). In 1982, the Houston Congenital CMV Longitudinal Study began looking into the prevalence of congenital CMV infection in Houston and … Continue reading